Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are not associated with adverse outcomes in Clostridium difficile infection

  • Dejan Micic Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Chicago, IL, United States.
  • Krishna Rao Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
  • Bruno Caetano Trindade Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
  • Seth T. Walk Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
  • Elizabeth Chenoweth University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
  • Ruchika Jain Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
  • Itishree Trivedi Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
  • Kavitha Santhosh Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
  • Vincent B. Young Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.
  • David M. Aronoff | d.aronoff@vanderbilt.edu Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.

Abstract

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant source of healthcare-associated morbidity and mortality. This study investigated whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with adverse outcomes from CDI. Patients with CDI were prospectively enrolled. Charts were reviewed and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured. The primary outcome was a composite definition of severe disease: fever (temperature >38°C), acute organ dysfunction, or serum white blood cell count >15,000 cells/μL within 24-48 hours of diagnosis; lack of response to therapy by day 5; and intensive care unit admission; colectomy; or death within 30 days. Sixty-seven patients were included in the final analysis. Mean (±SD) serum 25- hydroxyvitamin D was 26.1 (±18.54) ng/mL. Severe disease, which occurred in 26 (39%) participants, was not associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [odds ratio (OR) 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.04]. In the adjusted model for severe disease only serum albumin (OR 0.12; 95%CI 0.02-0.64) and diagnosis by detection of stool toxin (OR 5.87; 95%CI 1.09-31.7) remained independent predictors. We conclude that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is not associated with the development of severe disease in patients with CDI.

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Published
2015-09-29
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Keywords:
Vitamin D, Clostridium difficile, colitis, biomarkers
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How to Cite
Micic, D., Rao, K., Trindade, B. C., Walk, S. T., Chenoweth, E., Jain, R., Trivedi, I., Santhosh, K., Young, V. B., & Aronoff, D. M. (2015). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are not associated with adverse outcomes in Clostridium difficile infection. Infectious Disease Reports, 7(3). https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2015.5979