Hyperuricemia and carotid artery dilatation among young adults without metabolic syndrome

  • Eswar Krishnan | e.krishnan@stanford.edu Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, United States.
  • Rachel P. Wildman Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY, United States.
  • Emma Barinas-Mitchell Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
  • Jennifer Cooper Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
  • Kim Sutton-Tyrrell Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA, United States.

Abstract

It is not known if hyperuricemia is associated with early vascular changes signifying arteriosclerosis. We performed a cross sectional study of 163 young adults without metabolic syndrome in Allegheny County, PA, USA. Doppler ultrasound was used to measure two metrics of early arteriosclerosis: carotid artery dimensions and aortic pulse wave velocity. Individuals in the highest quartiles of serum uric acid (>6.2 mg/dL for men and >4.6 for women) were more likely to be of younger age, and to possess greater measures of adiposity and an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Higher serum uric acid concentration was associated with larger luminal and adventitial diameters as well as changes in diameters between the phases of the cardiac cycle (P<0.001) but not with carotid intima media thickness, pulse wave velocity, or pressure strain modulus. In multivariable linear regression models where the effects of age, ethnicity, serum creatinine, systolic blood pressure, current alcohol use, body mass index and smoking status were accounted for, the highest quartile of serum uric acid was associated with greater luminal and adventitial diameters and change in luminal diameter between the phases of cardiac cycle (P<0.05), but not with pulse wave velocity, pressure strain modulus or carotid intima media thickness. We can conclude that hyperuricemia is associated with larger carotid artery diameters signifying an early adaptive response to vascular stress. This has implications on the observed link between hyperuricemia and hypertension.

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Published
2012-10-16
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Keywords:
uric acid, carotid artery, ultrasound, adaptation
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How to Cite
Krishnan, E., Wildman, R. P., Barinas-Mitchell, E., Cooper, J., & Sutton-Tyrrell, K. (2012). Hyperuricemia and carotid artery dilatation among young adults without metabolic syndrome. Rheumatology Reports, 4(1), e7. https://doi.org/10.4081/rr.2012.e7