More confident trauma resuscitation team leaders: a novel simulation-based training curriculum utilizing video feedback

  • John L. Falcone | falconej@upmc.edu University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
  • Paul E. Phrampus University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
  • Andrew B. Peitzman University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
  • Louis H. Alarcon University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
  • Raquel M. Forsythe University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.

Abstract

There are deficiencies in trauma leader performance. Simulation training and video-based feedback can lead to durable changes in behavior. A trauma resuscitation team leader training curriculum was developed. The curriculum consisted of eight simulated trauma scenarios with a mix of acuities and injury patterns using patient simulators. Other team members included a surgeon, an anesthesiologist, a chief resident, a trauma nurse, a medical student, and presenting emergency medicine staff. Each scenario was followed by video-based feedback. Attitudes regarding this curriculum were evaluated before and after the intervention with Likert-based surveys. Eight residents completed the curriculum. On a seven-point Likert scale, the median overall curriculum rating, the video discussion quality, the plan to apply leadership skills, and the plan to apply learned knowledge and behaviors was 7/7. A Wilcoxon Sign-Rank test showed improved confidence for leading Level 1 trauma resuscitations, improved beliefs in adequate training, and improved attitudes regarding team leader training (P<0.05). There was reduced nervousness of being the team leader (P=0.048). Qualitative analyses showed that the learners valued the feedback process and scenario realism. This pilot curriculum was well-received by trauma residents and offers insight into meta-cognition of trauma team leaders.

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Published
2013-02-11
Info
Issue
Section
Innovations
Keywords:
competency-based education, curriculum, educational measurement, interdisciplinary health team, patient simulation
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  • PDF: 522
How to Cite
Falcone, J. L., Phrampus, P. E., Peitzman, A. B., Alarcon, L. H., & Forsythe, R. M. (2013). More confident trauma resuscitation team leaders: a novel simulation-based training curriculum utilizing video feedback. Medical Education Development, 3(1), e1. https://doi.org/10.4081/med.2013.e1