Clinical features of hemichoreahemiballism: A stroke-related movement disorder

  • Nobuko Shiraiwa | shiraiwa@xa2.so-net.ne.jp Course of Neurology, Department of Health Sciences, Tsukuba University of Technology; 2Department of Neurology, Tsukuba Memorial Hospital, Japan.
  • Sachiko Hoshino Department of Neurology, Tsukuba Memorial Hospital, Japan.
  • Go Saito Primary Care and Medical Education, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Japan.
  • Akira Tamaoka Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Japan.
  • Norio Ohkoshi Course of Neurology, Department of Health Sciences, Tsukuba University of Technology; Department of Radiological Technology, Tsukuba International University, Japan.

Abstract

We examined pathogenesis and clinical features of three hemichorea-hemiballism (HCHB) cases. We studied their age, magnetic resonance imaging results, vascular risk factors, management, and outcomes. One man and two women (aged 74-86 years) demonstrated acute onset of HCHB, lasting for at least several months. Patients had one or more vascular risk factors, including hypertension and diabetes. All patients presented subacute or old infarction in the basal ganglia with contralateral symptoms. We administered clonazepam (0.5-1 mg/day), haloperidol (0.375-0.75 mg/day), or both as necessary and observed symptom-control. Vascular lesions in the basal ganglia were a contributing factor. Symptoms were controlled using pharmacotherapy with gamma-aminobutyric acid-agonist (clonazepam) or anti-dopaminergic (haloperidol) medication.

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Published
2020-07-10
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Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
Hemichorea-hemiballism, Strokerelated movement disorders, basal ganglia
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How to Cite
Shiraiwa, N., Hoshino, S., Saito, G., Tamaoka, A., & Ohkoshi, N. (2020). Clinical features of hemichoreahemiballism: A stroke-related movement disorder. Neurology International, 12(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/ni.2020.8328