Factors impacting arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operational throughput time at an ambulatory care center

  • Emily J. Curry Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.
  • Catherine Logan Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
  • Kaytelin Suslavich Tufts University School of Medicine Boston, MA, United States.
  • Kaitlyn Whitlock Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.
  • Eric Berkson Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, MA, United States.
  • Elizabeth Matzkin | ematzkin@partners.org Department of Orthopedic Surgery Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States.

Abstract

Identifying patient factors influencing operational throughput time is becoming more imperative due to an increasing focus on value and cost savings in healthcare. The primary objective of this study was to determine patient factors influencing throughput time for primary rotator cuff repairs. Demographic information, medical history and operative reports of 318 patients from one ambulatory care center were retrospectively reviewed. Operating room set up, incision to closure and recovery room time were collected from anesthesia records. Univariate analysis was performed for both continuous and categorical variables. A stepwise, multivariable regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with operating room time (incision to closure) and recovery room time. Of the 318 patients, the mean age was 54.4±10.0 and 197 (61%) were male. Male patients had a significantly longer OR time than females (115.5 vs. 100.8 minutes; P<0.001). Furthermore, patients set up in the beach chair position had a significantly longer OR time than patients positioned lateral decubitus (115.8 vs. 89.6 mins, P<0.0001). Number of tendons involved, and inclusion of distal clavicle excision, biceps tenodesis and labral debridement also added significant OR time. Type and number of support staff present also significantly affected OR time. Recovery room time was significantly longer patients who had surgery in the beach chair position (+9.61 minutes) and for those who had a cardiac-related medical comorbidity (+11.7 minutes). Our study found that patients positioned in a beach chair spent significantly more time in the operating and recovery rooms. While ease of set up has been a stated advantage ofbeach chair position, we found the perceived ease of set up does not result in more efficient OR throughput.

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Published
2018-03-29
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Original Articles
Keywords:
beach chair, lateral decubitus, throughput, rotator cuff repair
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How to Cite
Curry, E. J., Logan, C., Suslavich, K., Whitlock, K., Berkson, E., & Matzkin, E. (2018). Factors impacting arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operational throughput time at an ambulatory care center. Orthopedic Reviews, 10(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/or.2018.7577